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Archive for the ‘technology’ Category

As Social Critic readers know, there has been no blow-by-blow effort to dissect news of the ongoing Trump-Russia investigation. The reason? Doing so relies too heavily on speculation. Until special counsel Robert S. Mueller III weighs in, the jury remains out. Of course, that hasn’t stopped a bifurcated mainstream media from leaving little doubt in the minds of their respective readers and viewers as to how guilty — or innocent — President Trump is of Russia-collusion allegations. Caught between the competing partisan wings of the American media, one can expect that from time to time key “dots” will fail to connect in the public mind. This is one such time.

The first under-reported development centers around the revelation that FBI Director James Comey, according to the Inspector General Michael E. Horowitz, made use of a Gmail account to transact FBI business. This is relevant not simply in the context of whether or not classified information may have been conveyed over a Gmail account — which Comey denies — but because the Russian “hack” began with phishing emails.

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Journalism is in the midst of a slow-motion crisis.

When I was in journalism school, students learned how to write using the “inverted pyramid” approach. The inverted pyramid is a style of writing that dates back to the days when paper real estate — in a print newspaper — was limited. Editors who wished to make room for breaking stories needed the option to lop the bottom of the story off with minimal risk of omitting critical details. The inverted pyramid calls for the most vital aspects of a story to appear at the top. This allows editors more flexibility while recognizing the fact that not all readers make the page jump to continue reading an article that concludes elsewhere. As a result, it was important then — as it is now — to lead with the most relevant details. A properly crafted story lede (introduction) encapsulates the basics: Who?, What?, When?, Where? and Why?.

In the Digital Era print real estate isn’t the limiting factor it once was. But there are indications the digital medium has shortened readers’ attention spans. It is of vital importance, as a result, to impart key facts “up top” — if only because web viewers are likely to skim content and move on.

Something, however, has changed in the way a lot of news organizations craft and promote stories. Call it sloppiness — lax editing — or journalistic “spin”. Some of the most controversial stories to appear in mainstream media are prefaced by misleading headlines on social media — titles that don’t square with a complete read of the content. Misleading headlines on social media posts are far from the only problem, however. Take, as an example, two contradictory narratives: Person/institution “X” and person/institution “Y” disagree over who did what or why. What should a responsible journalist do with this unwieldy story line? The answer is to disclose the ambiguity very early on  — to make clear to readers that a situation is in flux and/or that key aspects of the story are in dispute.

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If one were to jump into a time machine to travel back to 1995 or thereabouts, what would the publishers of newspapers and magazines have to say about the “Internet”? One might assume, at first glance, that the Internet would be a publisher’s dream: unprecedented reach beyond the usual regional scope, access to new readership, more advertising opportunities and expanded market share. But that’s not what happened. Hundreds of publishers, both regional and national, found themselves struggling, instead, to make sense of how to translate the digital venue into an improved bottom line. It didn’t help that this digital medium spawned a paradox: more readers, less circulation; more ad potential, less ad revenue. The very same readership who could be reached at unlimited distance through the Internet now enjoyed a smorgasbord of competing blogs, news and social media outlets from which to gather information. It proved too much, too fast, leaving print media to quibble over an increasingly fragmented market. That the print industry is struggling to remain afloat is widely appreciated now. But what’s only beginning to be appreciated is that much of the economy — bricks-and-mortar retailers, in particular — will face the same paradox: greater sales reach in the face of diminishing returns.

The chopping axe is coming for the traditional retail space now. But are retailers any better prepared than their print news counterparts?

Retail as We Know It — but for How Long? (more…)

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