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The 2016 presidential election year in many ways reflects the way in which reality TV — never at a loss for drama, exhibitionism and outrage  — has begun to influence political theater. Political races have always been, to an extent, a dog-and-pony show. But GOP candidate Donald J. Trump’s out-sized assertions and foot-in-mouth moments don’t seem to have cost him to the degree they would have cost a presidential candidate in elections past. Aided by the let-it-all-hang-out evolution of social media, what passes for reasonable discourse rests at an exceedingly low bar. The question is, just how much success can a presidential candidate enjoy using this provocative formula?

Perhaps Trump’s success, beyond the fact that his outrageous statements attract a great deal of media coverage, would have failed if The Donald did not also tap into a growing populist frustration, signaling a sea-change the political establishment can no longer afford to ignore.

For all his grandiosity, Trump has managed to tap into very real American concerns.

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There is something attractive about defrocking a figure of faith-and-family-values virtue, particularly one of great commercial success who has endeared himself to an endangered minority: the American middle class. The late Thomas Kinkade, who died of unnamed causes Friday, made an easy target. The self-anointed “painter of light” specialized in idealized scenes harkening to a more innocent and bucolic time. Such art might be expected from a pastor’s wife or a bookish introvert yet it was the high degree of contrast between the artist’s placid and peaceable imagery and his real-world foibles and flaws that made him an irresistible subject for personal and artistic attack.

In the wake of Kinkade’s untimely death at age 54, the Los Angeles Times rehashed a 2006 exposé in which the painter was portrayed as a drunken, ruthless and foulmouthed hypocrite.  Whatever one may believe about the man, the art world has stood firm about his vision: Kinkade is a commercial success but his paintings do not merit creative or historic memory.

Kinkade’s artistic legacy is as much in question as his personal one. (more…)

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